Enid Kelsey, Arts and Crafts silver server, London 1937
Enid Kelsey, Arts and Crafts silver server, London 1937, reverseEnid Kelsey, Arts and Crafts silver server, London 1937, finial detailEnid Kelsey, Arts and Crafts silver server, London 1937, blade detailEnid Kelsey, Arts and Crafts silver server, London 1937, blade close up

Enid Kelsey, Arts and Crafts silver server, London 1937

£145.00

Enid Kelsey, Arts and Crafts silver server, London 1937, stamped makers mark E.K. for Enid Kelsey, the finial of a curled fish repeated to the engraved and pierced blade, all hand hammered, possibly a sardine server, 12.5 cm long, blade 4 cm wide

Enid registered her mark in London in 1929, giving her address as 17 Northway, Temple Fortune, London, NW11. Sometimes her work can be found in original cases giving the same address. Her work often features planishing. Enid’s husband, Cyril Kelsey, known as ‘the Professor’, had been apprenticed as a silversmith with Charles Ashbee in 1899, and been involved in many of the Guild’s plays before joining the army and going to South Africa. On his return he worked as a clerk in a London shipping office. He and Enid’s theatrical leaning led to them co-writing a play in the 1930’s entitled ‘The Stars’, which was revived as recently as 2000.

Product Description

Enid Kelsey, Arts and Crafts silver server, London 1937, stamped makers mark E.K. for Enid Kelsey, the finial of a curled fish repeated to the engraved and pierced blade, all hand hammered, possibly a sardine server, 12.5 cm long, blade 4 cm wide

Enid registered her mark in London in 1929, giving her address as 17 Northway, Temple Fortune, London, NW11. Sometimes her work can be found in original cases giving the same address. Her work often features planishing. Enid’s husband, Cyril Kelsey, known as ‘the Professor’, had been apprenticed as a silversmith with Charles Ashbee in 1899, and been involved in many of the Guild’s plays before joining the army and going to South Africa. On his return he worked as a clerk in a London shipping office. He and Enid’s theatrical leaning led to them co-writing a play in the 1930’s entitled ‘The Stars’, which was revived as recently as 2000.